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What's everyone been up to?

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Jameson

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Jan 26, 2012
4,052
Well 2020 has been a wild year so far for me, my city, state, country, and the whole world. The changes have been disruptive to any sort of "normal" in terms of prior years. I miss going to restaurants, movie theaters, parks, the airport. So many places that seemed untouchable in terms of closing or changing so much that it's not the same. I do see a positive side to this through being forced to acknowledge nothing is permanent, routine and business can dull imagination and creativity if one lets it, and biggest for me is face to face connection is special.

What has anyone else learned or experienced in this unique point in history? Funny, sad, light, or heavy I am happy to read anything! Hope everyone is well and if you feel like it please say hi. (Wave)
 

Monoxdifly

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Aug 6, 2015
287
To be grateful about what we have. I am really grateful because I get to keep my job while similar business nearby are going bankrupt.
 
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Jameson

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Jan 26, 2012
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That's a wonderful mindset. I feel similar.

I used to love flying and traveling around the US for work or personal trips. I have a feeling of adventure and freedom at my city's airport, so this is something smaller I miss and hope comes back. Movie theaters, plays, and walking in cities with no 2020 worries are all things I'd smile if came back.

Has anyone started a new hobby or had an unexpected positive change?
 

Greg Bernhardt

Administrator
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Feb 3, 2012
140
Lots of blogging and learning Python :D
 

Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
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Jan 26, 2012
4,197
Lots of blogging and learning Python :D
Aha! Love Python. I don't know of a more readable language than Python. So many things are just intuitive in Python, especially compared to, say, SAS - a language that should have died a long time ago.
 

jonah

New member
Feb 21, 2015
15
Beer soaked comment follows.
Funny, sad, light, or heavy I am happy to read anything! Hope everyone is well and if you feel like it please say hi. (Wave)
Boozing.
And Math Knight-Errantry (Usual consequence of getting hammered, along with singing along to one's favorite artists & songs on YouTube).
 

Klaas van Aarsen

MHB Seeker
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Mar 5, 2012
8,789
Beer soaked comment follows.

Boozing.
And Math Knight-Errantry (Usual consequence of getting hammered, along with singing along to one's favorite artists & songs on YouTube).
Are you still tanking up on beer?
I really like beer. However, I've switched to a 0% version that I also really like, and I'm tanking lots of it. :)
 
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Jameson

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Jan 26, 2012
4,052
Lots of blogging and learning Python :D
One of these things makes a lot of sense for 2020 and I'm also into, the other seems impossible. :unsure: Blogging on PF or other places?
Aha! Love Python. I don't know of a more readable language than Python. So many things are just intuitive in Python, especially compared to, say, SAS - a language that should have died a long time ago.
SAS is a monolith as we both know and banks, pharma, etc. have been clinging to it for way too long out of fear of updating. It does handle larger data sets better than Python if you are running locally in RAM, but otherwise if's time to go. I spent 7 years becoming an expert level coder for SAS too and I'd happily throw that time away for the cause. What I run into at my work now is a model validation team says "SAS has source code and we can check all these things..." but that isn't even true. SAS is a closed language that seems open but it takes SAS syntax and converts to C when running but you can't see this. When students no longer use it at all that will be a good sign.
 

Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
Staff member
Jan 26, 2012
4,197
One of these things makes a lot of sense for 2020 and I'm also into, the other seems impossible. :unsure: Blogging on PF or other places?

SAS is a monolith as we both know and banks, pharma, etc. have been clinging to it for way too long out of fear of updating. It does handle larger data sets better than Python if you are running locally in RAM, but otherwise if's time to go.
Not in my experience. SAS is extremely picky about formatting in files compared to Python, so developer time is ridiculous just for reading files in. Next week, I'm going to hear a colleague talk about Cython, which is Python dressed up in C and is apparently much faster for certain things. He said there was one file that got read in normal Python in 2 hours, but took 30 seconds in Cython.

I spent 7 years becoming an expert level coder for SAS too and I'd happily throw that time away for the cause. What I run into at my work now is a model validation team says "SAS has source code and we can check all these things..." but that isn't even true. SAS is a closed language that seems open but it takes SAS syntax and converts to C when running but you can't see this. When students no longer use it at all that will be a good sign.
Yep, definitely agree. The big companies target universities, because if you build the free user base there, you can keep 'em coming when they graduate. TI does the same thing with calculators. Mind you, TI calculators are quite respectable; problem is, they're too geared towards standardized tests like AP Stats. Those standardized tests don't allow for truly great features to come out. For crying out loud: most phones have WAY more capability than a calculator, and the prices are actually comparable sometimes! End of rant.
 

jonah

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Feb 21, 2015
15

Greg

Perseverance
Staff member
Feb 5, 2013
1,384
Haha! Posting on Facebook (while trying to make things as entertaining as I can 🤷‍♂️). My math is VERY rusty! Lots of work to do and I will be posting much more in the coming days! Good to be back! 😁
 

Jameson

Administrator
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Jan 26, 2012
4,052
Not in my experience. SAS is extremely picky about formatting in files compared to Python, so developer time is ridiculous just for reading files in. Next week, I'm going to hear a colleague talk about Cython, which is Python dressed up in C and is apparently much faster for certain things. He said there was one file that got read in normal Python in 2 hours, but took 30 seconds in Cython.
Not to accidentally defend SAS here but it sounds like you're writing manual input statements? If so, SAS Enterprise Guide and other common implementations of SAS have pretty good column type auto detection and this part is at least not as much of a headache with these parts. Even banks and institutions who cling to old software pay for this type of functionality. If you don't have it at work then the gap between this and Pandas is huge I do agree, but it exists.

Python looks almost like pseudo-code if you are coming from other languages I'm told and the flexible nature of it is a huge selling point. The downside to less explicit requirements is performance and it's definitely true that Python is an order of magnitude slower than C, C++, and other common languages. That said many common modules like NumPy use C in their execution, which is exactly the Cython idea you are writing about and is really interesting to explore.
 

Jameson

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Jan 26, 2012
4,052
Haha! Posting on Facebook (while trying to make things as entertaining as I can 🤷‍♂️). My math is VERY rusty! Lots of work to do and I will be posting much more in the coming days! Good to be back! 😁
Now that is more of a "typical" medium than I was teasing @Greg Bernhardt for referring to! Glad to see you and that you said hi.
 

Joppy

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MHB Math Helper
Mar 17, 2016
259
Python looks almost like pseudo-code if you are coming from other languages I'm told and the flexible nature of it is a huge selling point. The downside to less explicit requirements is performance and it's definitely true that Python is an order of magnitude slower than C, C++, and other common languages. That said many common modules like NumPy use C in their execution, which is exactly the Cython idea you are writing about and is really interesting to explore.
I think all the cool kids are using Julia these days which "walks like Python and runs like C"..
 

topsquark

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MHB Math Helper
Aug 30, 2012
1,133
What does Julia Child have to do with snakes? Was she using them in casseroles or something?

-Dan
 

Joppy

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MHB Math Helper
Mar 17, 2016
259

Janssens

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Sep 16, 2017
204
I think all the cool kids are using Julia these days which "walks like Python and runs like C"..
If only it would run like Fortran... 😋
 

Greg Bernhardt

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Feb 3, 2012
140