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Resources to help a parent with child's math struggles

scottkoz20

New member
Sep 21, 2017
11
Hi everyone -

I'm not sure if this is the right spot, I apologize up front if it's not.

I have a 4th grader in the house and she struggles with Math. Add this to the fact that I have an engineering degree, I find helping my daughter a struggle.

I have tried to do some different things for her to visually see the problems that are asked, but sometimes it works and sometimes I think I make it more difficult for her.

For those with kids in 4th (and even 5th/6th) grade, what have you found that has helped your kids ensure the math knowledge is retained.


Thanks,
Scott
 

Janssens

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2017
204
Re: Resources to help a parent with childs math struggles

I am not sure whether you would also be looking for book recommendations, but Enzensberger's The Number Devil came to my mind. It was originally written in German but offered in English translation and it was received mostly favorably, but that is also a very personal matter.
 

Greg

Perseverance
Staff member
Feb 5, 2013
1,384
Re: Resources to help a parent with childs math struggles

Try spending a lot of time on the basics. Math is something relatively new to a 4th grader and the familiarity will help.
 

scottkoz20

New member
Sep 21, 2017
11
Re: Resources to help a parent with childs math struggles

I am not sure whether you would also be looking for book recommendations, but Enzensberger's The Number Devil came to my mind. It was originally written in German but offered in English translation and it was received mostly favorably, but that is also a very personal matter.
I dont mind reading at all. Just looking any suggestions that I potentially use to help.

Try spending a lot of time on the basics. Math is something relatively new to a 4th grader and the familiarity will help.
your point on the basics is the part I think the frustrates me the most, I can't go 2 straight days, asking her some basic adding and she struggles with it. However, I am interested on your perspective of math is something relatively new for a 4th grader. She's been taking math since 1st grade, I try to work with her on basics that she should know. I dont think of it is being new, but as the concepts build... I see your point
 

Klaas van Aarsen

MHB Seeker
Staff member
Mar 5, 2012
8,789
Re: Resources to help a parent with childs math struggles

I dont mind reading at all. Just looking any suggestions that I potentially use to help.

your point on the basics is the part I think the frustrates me the most, I can't go 2 straight days, asking her some basic adding and she struggles with it. However, I am interested on your perspective of math is something relatively new for a 4th grader. She's been taking math since 1st grade, I try to work with her on basics that she should know. I dont think of it is being new, but as the concepts build... I see your point
It's normal for kids to struggle with adding and multiplication.

Consider adding or multiplying in octal. Perhaps you're familiar with it?
It means counting to 8 instead of 10.
123 in octal, which we'll denote as 123o, actually means $1\cdot 8^2 + 2\cdot 8 + 3 = 83$ in decimal.
How would you add 54o to 48o - without falling back to the decimal system?

A kid needs to be taught how to figure that out (for the decimal system), and then practice, practice, practice with it.
 

scottkoz20

New member
Sep 21, 2017
11
Re: Resources to help a parent with childs math struggles

I am not sure whether you would also be looking for book recommendations, but Enzensberger's The Number Devil came to my mind. It was originally written in German but offered in English translation and it was received mostly favorably, but that is also a very personal matter.
Try spending a lot of time on the basics. Math is something relatively new to a 4th grader and the familiarity will help.
It's normal for kids to struggle with adding and multiplication.

Consider adding or multiplying in octal. Perhaps you're familiar with it?
It means counting to 8 instead of 10.
123 in octal, which we'll denote as 123o, actually means $1\cdot 8^2 + 2\cdot 8 + 3 = 83$ in decimal.
How would you add 54o to 48o - without falling back to the decimal system?

A kid needs to be taught how to figure that out (for the decimal system), and then practice, practice, practice with it.
I get it - I do. At the end of the day, I want to be there to help her be confident in her math skills and not get frustrated and shutdown.

As an aside for Octal, 48o would really be 50o since the numbers would go from 0-7 :D (I remembered something from my Digital mathematics class in college from 20 years ago).


I really do appreciate the comments