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Number Theory Primitive Pythagorean triple

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Poirot

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Feb 15, 2012
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I know that (a^2-b^2,2ab,a^2+b^2) is pythagorean triple. How to show it is primitive? i.e
gcd(x,y,z)=1
 

soroban

Well-known member
Feb 2, 2012
409
Re: primitive pythagorean triple

Hello, Poirot!

I know that (x,y,z) = (a2 - b2, 2ab, a2 + b2) is a Pythagorean triple.

How to show it is primitive? .i.e. gcd(x,y,z) = 1

I'm not sure how we "show" it, but here is a fact.

For a primitive Pythagorean triple, a and b must be of opposite parity.
. . (One must be even, the other must be odd.)
 

Opalg

MHB Oldtimer
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Feb 7, 2012
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Poirot

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Feb 15, 2012
250
Re: primitive pythagorean triple

I'm pretty sure a contradiction argument is expedient.

assume x,y,z have a common factor d not equal to 1.
Since everything can be factorized into primes can I assume d is prime?