Welcome to our community

Be a part of something great, join today!

Polynomial Terms

PeekaTweak

New member
Jan 21, 2019
1
I would like to have someone who would be willing to explain me what is a like term and an unlike term in terms of set theory. I'm just an high-scool student, but I really would like to understand it from that point of view anyway. It doesn't have to be a 1000 pages long of explanations.
 

topsquark

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Aug 30, 2012
1,123
I would like to have someone who would be willing to explain me what is a like term and an unlike term in terms of set theory. I'm just an high-scool student, but I really would like to understand it from that point of view anyway. It doesn't have to be a 1000 pages long of explanations.
In terms of polynomials (I can't think of how to applied this to sets) a "like" term is a comparison between two terms of the polynomial. For example, consider the two polynomials \(\displaystyle 3x^2 + 2x - 3\) and \(\displaystyle 5x^3 - 3x + 7\). The like terms are the terms that are in both polynomials. Here the there is only one like term: the one in x. (I suppose you could call the constant terms "like" as they are both terms in \(\displaystyle x^0\) but I don't think anyone does this.)

-Dan