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Monetary Values

Hobo5

New member
Mar 27, 2018
9
Sir,
In 1927 the English Pound was USD 4.86. What would be the reverse for $1.00, with the Pound value expressed in £ s d.
Would there be a formula for this conversion?
Thank you for any help you may provide.
Regards,
P.N.
 

tkhunny

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 27, 2012
267
Re: Monetory Values

Sir,
In 1927 the English Pound was USD 4.86. What would be the reverse for $1.00, with the Pound value expressed in £ s d.
Would there be a formula for this conversion?
Thank you for any help you may provide.
Regards,
P.N.
1 £ = 4.86 USD

Divide by 4.86

0.205761317 £ = 1 USD, so 4 shillings and a ha'penny?.
 

Hobo5

New member
Mar 27, 2018
9
Re: Monetory Values

1 £ = 4.86 USD

Divide by 4.86

0.205761317 £ = 1 USD, so 4 shillings and a ha'penny?.
Thank you for your helpful reply.
Have a great day,
P.N.
 

Country Boy

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 30, 2018
469
Sir,
In 1927 the English Pound was USD 4.86.
So to go from English Pounds to USD, you would multiply by 4.86.

What would be the reverse for $1.00, with the Pound value expressed in £ s d.
To reverse that do the reverse of multiplying- divide by 4.86.

Would there be a formula for this conversion?
Thank you for any help you may provide.
Regards,
P.N.
 

Wilmer

In Memoriam
Mar 19, 2012
376
...enough for 1 pound of Yorkshire pudding?
 

tkhunny

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 27, 2012
267
So to go from English Pounds to USD, you would multiply by 4.86.


To reverse that do the reverse of multiplying- divide by 4.86.
Think about one thing before you decide to multiply or divide. "Will I have more or less when I am done?"

If 4.86 USD = 1 BP, then you must have more USD than BP. If you calculate and get less, you did something wrong.
 

Hobo5

New member
Mar 27, 2018
9
Think about one thing before you decide to multiply or divide. "Will I have more or less when I am done?"

If 4.86 USD = 1 BP, then you must have more USD than BP. If you calculate and get less, you did something wrong.
Thank you again for getting back to me.....but can you please explain the four shillings and the ha'penny?
P.N.

- - - Updated - - -

...enough for 1 pound of Yorkshire pudding?
Wilmer,
Thank you for your reply...and yes, it should be enough for the pudding!
P.N.
 

Country Boy

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 30, 2018
469
Thank you again for getting back to me.....but can you please explain the four shillings and the ha'penny?
P.N.

- - - Updated - - -



Wilmer,
Thank you for your reply...and yes, it should be enough for the pudding!
P.N.
As I said before, Since 1 pound is 4.86 dollars, 1 dollar is 1/4.86 pounds= 0.206 pounds. Now, you need to know that there are 20 shilling in a pounds so 0.206 pounds is 20(0.206)= 4.12 shillings. And there are 12 pence per shilling so 12(0.12)= 1.44 pence. I would say that is closer to 4 shilling two pence than 4 shilling ha'penny (half-penny).
 

Hobo5

New member
Mar 27, 2018
9
As I said before, Since 1 pound is 4.86 dollars, 1 dollar is 1/4.86 pounds= 0.206 pounds. Now, you need to know that there are 20 shilling in a pounds so 0.206 pounds is 20(0.206)= 4.12 shillings. And there are 12 pence per shilling so 12(0.12)= 1.44 pence. I would say that is closer to 4 shilling two pence than 4 shilling ha'penny (half-penny).
Got it.
Thanks again.
 

tkhunny

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 27, 2012
267
As I said before, Since 1 pound is 4.86 dollars, 1 dollar is 1/4.86 pounds= 0.206 pounds. Now, you need to know that there are 20 shilling in a pounds so 0.206 pounds is 20(0.206)= 4.12 shillings. And there are 12 pence per shilling so 12(0.12)= 1.44 pence. I would say that is closer to 4 shilling two pence than 4 shilling ha'penny (half-penny).
Fair enough. Let one read up! Understanding old British money - pounds, shillings and pence
 

Country Boy

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 30, 2018
469
I really should have written "tuppence"!
 

Hobo5

New member
Mar 27, 2018
9
I really should have written "tuppence"!
When I started this thread it revolved around 1927. In those days, I guess you could have got something for "tuppence"!
Have a good one,
P.N.
 

tkhunny

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 27, 2012
267
I confess. I falsified my results just so I could say "ha'penny". I mean, how often do you get to say that?!
 

Country Boy

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 30, 2018
469
I think "tuppence" is cooler!
 

Hobo5

New member
Mar 27, 2018
9

Hobo5

New member
Mar 27, 2018
9

Country Boy

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 30, 2018
469
Does anyone (other than me) remember that Agatha Christie wrote a series of mysteries featuring "Tommy and Tuppence" a married couple. I don't believe it was ever explained where the woman got the nickname "Tuppence". One remarkable thing about the series was that, unlike Miss Marple or Inspector Poirot, they aged in "real time". In the first novel, they were young "flappers" in their early twenties. In the last novel, written 50 years later, they were in their 70s with grand children (and she was still called "Tuppence").

Ah, well, back to mathematics.