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[SOLVED] Learning Texas Instruments Calculator

DeusAbscondus

Active member
Jun 30, 2012
176
I am used to Classpad but have to quickly train myself up to use TI for exam requirements.

I can't work out how to do 2 bread and butter things:

1. get an answer in exact form, ie: $$\frac{\pi}{2}+\frac{\pi}{2}=\pi$$ and,
2. how to differentiate $$x^2\ or\ 2x^3+3x$$ without having to stipulate a value for $x$; ie: simply to get the first derivative of an f(x); conversely, how to do this for integration without stipulating a domain, in other words, how to calculate an indefinite integral

(I've read, and am reading again, the appropriate parts of the manual, honest!)

Thanks,
D'abs

(Perhaps this should go in Calculus, huh?)
 

MarkFL

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 24, 2012
13,775

MarkFL

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 24, 2012
13,775
Re: Learning Texas Calculator

I have a TI-89 Titanium, so unfortunately I will have to let someone with the TI-83 Plus address your questions, to ensure you get the best instructions.
 

Jameson

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 26, 2012
4,052
Re: Learning Texas Calculator

Hi DeusAbscondus,

The reason why you can't figure out how to do either of these things is because the TI-83+ can't do them. :( It can only do definite integration and although it's wonderful with fractions, it won't output things in terms of $\pi$. If you think that the final answer should be in terms of $\pi$ you can try the following. Let's say your calculator outputs $x$ and you think that this is some multiple of $\pi$. Take \(\displaystyle \frac{x}{\pi}\) and see what you get, and let's call that $y$. The answer is also $y \pi$.

Jameson
 

DeusAbscondus

Active member
Jun 30, 2012
176
Re: Learning Texas calculator

Probably the best forum is:
Mathematics Software and Calculator Discussion


What TI model do you have?

Thanks Mark and Jameson;
well that is annoying, especially as I have cut my teeth on a classpad which does both!

it seems a silly restriction, but i guess they have to have an agreed benchmark so that every student has access to exactly the same funtionality

Thanks for clearing up that mystery Jameson;
no less for the practical tip!
Cheers,
D'abs
 

Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
Staff member
Jan 26, 2012
4,197
Re: Learning Texas Calculator

Don't know if you have the option, but if you're up for a bit of a learning curve, the HP 50g is an amazing calculator. It can do all that stuff (symbolic differentiation and integration), as well as utilize the Reverse Polish Notation with stack, particularly useful for evaluating intermediate results on the fly.
 

DeusAbscondus

Active member
Jun 30, 2012
176
Re: Learning Texas Calculator

Don't know if you have the option, but if you're up for a bit of a learning curve, the HP 50g is an amazing calculator. It can do all that stuff (symbolic differentiation and integration), as well as utilize the Reverse Polish Notation with stack, particularly useful for evaluating intermediate results on the fly.

Thanks Ackbach,
I'll check it with my instructress, though I think the guidelines come down to this:
"Get yourself a Texas, boy, or don't show!"
 

MarkFL

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 24, 2012
13,775
Re: Learning Texas Calculator

The TI-89 Titanium will do the things you asked about in the original post. It will compute derivatives and integrals symbolically, and output answers in terms of pi.