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Interpreting a proposition

kalish

Member
Oct 7, 2013
99
Could someone help me interpret the following proposition? I've been struggling to comprehend it. Thanks in advance.

Proposition: If $J \subset \mathbb{R}$ is an open interval containing the origin and $\gamma:J \rightarrow \mathbb{R^n}$ is a solution of the differential equation $\dot{x}=f(x)$ with $\gamma(0) = x_0 \in U$, then the function $B:J \rightarrow \mathbb{R}$ given by $$B(t) = \int_0^t\frac{1}{g(\gamma(s))}ds$$ is invertible on its range $K \subseteq \mathbb{R}$. If $\rho:K \rightarrow J$ is the inverse of $B$, then the identity $$\rho'(t) = g(\gamma(\rho(t)))$$ holds for all $t\in K$, and the function $\sigma:K \rightarrow \mathbb{R^n}$ given by $\sigma(t) = \gamma(\rho(t))$ is the solution of the differential equation $\dot{x}=g(x)f(x)$ with initial condition $\sigma(0) = x_0$.

I have crossposted this on: differential equations - Interpreting a proposition - Mathematics Stack Exchange