Welcome to our community

Be a part of something great, join today!

Integrating the Ln

dwsmith

Well-known member
Feb 1, 2012
1,673
$$
\int (\ln x)^pdx, \quad p > 0
$$
How do I go about integrating this?
 

Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
Staff member
Jan 26, 2012
4,197
Is $p$ an integer? If so, then you could do $u=\ln(x)$, which leads to
$$\int u^{p}e^{u}\,du,$$
which succumbs to by-parts as many times as you need. I'd recommend tabular integration in that case. If $p$ can be real, you get something a bit more nasty, with the incomplete Gamma function in there. I don't know how you get that result. I'd have to study a bit.
 

dwsmith

Well-known member
Feb 1, 2012
1,673
Is $p$ an integer? If so, then you could do $u=\ln(x)$, which leads to
$$\int u^{p}e^{u}\,du,$$
which succumbs to by-parts as many times as you need. I'd recommend tabular integration in that case. If $p$ can be real, you get something a bit more nasty, with the incomplete Gamma function in there. I don't know how you get that result. I'd have to study a bit.
p is a real number.