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how to plug in y variables in estcalc

jedson303

New member
Feb 23, 2013
12
I have an extcalc program on my computer. I can't seem to figure out how to get it to plug in "y" variables. (eg. x^2 + y^2) Your widget did this without any problem. (Looked great.) I am just getting underway with trying to understand -- in an elementary way -- certain areas of math based physics. I use a Linux platform. Ubuntu. Do I need a good tutorial on extcalc or would some other program that I could download meet my needs better?
 

Sudharaka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Feb 5, 2012
1,621
I have an extcalc program on my computer. I can't seem to figure out how to get it to plug in "y" variables. (eg. x^2 + y^2) Your widget did this without any problem. (Looked great.) I am just getting underway with trying to understand -- in an elementary way -- certain areas of math based physics. I use a Linux platform. Ubuntu. Do I need a good tutorial on extcalc or would some other program that I could download meet my needs better?
Hi jedson303, :)

Can you elaborate a little bit as to what you are trying to do with the Extcalc program? Are you trying to create a list of values for \(x^2+y^2\) when \(x\) and \(y\) take different values?
 

jedson303

New member
Feb 23, 2013
12
My real question is more elementary than what you suggest. The function I put up (if it is a legitimate fuction) was just meant as an example. I have completed a pre-calculus and a calculus course, but am pretty much of a beginner in all this. My goal is to be able to understand certain physics concepts in a mathematical way. I need a math program that can help me with this. Extcalc seemed a good prospect for this. But I couldn't get it to create any graph with a y variable. The graph plotter in your MHB Widgets does. So should I download and install a different program, or just learn more about how to use extcalc? I couldn't find any good tutorials on how to use it.

Jeson
 

jedson303

New member
Feb 23, 2013
12
Let me just withdraw my question. I have googled all over the place, and extcalc seems to be what I need. I have never used a calculator this complicated before. So I was looking around for tutorials on using it. There don't seem to be any, so I'll just figure it out, bit by bit. Their "help" answers some of my questions. I can't pester you people with this kind of thing.

Jedson
 

MarkFL

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 24, 2012
13,775
I'm not familiar with the software you are using, but sometimes a workaround to plotting implicit relationships is to use a parametric representation. Will extcalc plot parametric functions?
 

jedson303

New member
Feb 23, 2013
12
Re: how to plug in y variables in extcalc

It doesn't seem to. The only options I see for the graph types are standard, polar and 3D. Little by little I am getting it to do most of the things I want. It's not allowing me to plug in functions that use the y axis seems to be the main problem. It seems pretty complete except for that. I did find a "y" variable, and when I plugged in y+6 it showed a staight line at x=6, which makes sense. But when I tried y^2 it did the same thing. It should, I think, be a sideways parabala.

Jedson
 

Sudharaka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Feb 5, 2012
1,621
My real question is more elementary than what you suggest. The function I put up (if it is a legitimate fuction) was just meant as an example. I have completed a pre-calculus and a calculus course, but am pretty much of a beginner in all this. My goal is to be able to understand certain physics concepts in a mathematical way. I need a math program that can help me with this. Extcalc seemed a good prospect for this. But I couldn't get it to create any graph with a y variable. The graph plotter in your MHB Widgets does. So should I download and install a different program, or just learn more about how to use extcalc? I couldn't find any good tutorials on how to use it.

Jeson
I haven't used this software, but you might be interested in the graphics section of the Extcalc documentation.

Let me just withdraw my question. I have googled all over the place, and extcalc seems to be what I need. I have never used a calculator this complicated before. So I was looking around for tutorials on using it. There don't seem to be any, so I'll just figure it out, bit by bit. Their "help" answers some of my questions. I can't pester you people with this kind of thing.

Jedson
We like answering questions so don't hesitate to ask questions. :)

If you need a graph plotter which can plot two dimensional graphs then I would suggest using Desmos. It's quite easy to use. :)

If you need a two dimensional graph plotting software which can be installed in your computer Geogebra might come in handy.

For three dimensional graphs, you might find the following tool useful. Graph: x^2-y^2
 

jedson303

New member
Feb 23, 2013
12
For three dimensional graphs, you might find the following tool useful. Graph: x^2-y^2[
That is awesome. Just what I need. All sorts of other useful things on that site as well. It really helps me if I can view the functions that I am concerned about as they spin themselves out in a 2 or 3 coordinate system -- as needed. Will also take a look at the other ones you mentioned.

So that solves the immediate problem. Many thanks!

jedson
 

Sudharaka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Feb 5, 2012
1,621
That is awesome. Just what I need. All sorts of other useful things on that site as well. It really helps me if I can view the functions that I am concerned about as they spin themselves out in a 2 or 3 coordinate system -- as needed. Will also take a look at the other ones you mentioned.

So that solves the immediate problem. Many thanks!

jedson
You are welcome. :)
 

Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
Staff member
Jan 26, 2012
4,197
You might also check out Octave. It's open-source and installs easily on Ubuntu. It's a MATLAB look-alike - uses similar syntax. It can easily do what you're wanting, and is extremely powerful. Just have to get used to its syntax.
 

jedson303

New member
Feb 23, 2013
12
Hi --
Took a look at Octave. (It's possible to download it from the Ubuntu software center). It looks a bit more sophisitated than what I am needing right now. Probably x^2-y^2 for graphics and extcalc for a calculator will meet my needs for the moment. Down the line I may need somehting more powerful.

Thanks.