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Good High-School Level Text for Probability and Statistics

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Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
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Jan 26, 2012
4,197
I'm contemplating the possibility of teaching either a regular probability and statistics course or maybe even the AP Stats course at my high school next year. However, I only took the first semester in statistics at the junior level in college (used multivariable calculus); that means I got some probability, but no real statistics. So I'd be starting more or less from scratch. I am quite capable of teaching myself from a typical textbook. So if you have spent time in examining multiple textbooks yourself, which one would you recommend?

ADDENDUM: This book should not be calculus-based.
 
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Plato

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MHB Math Helper
Jan 27, 2012
196
I'm contemplating the possibility of teaching either a regular probability and statistics course or maybe even the AP Stats course at my high school next year. However, I only took the first semester in statistics at the junior level in college (used multivariable calculus); that means I got some probability, but no real statistics. So I'd be starting more or less from scratch. I am quite capable of teaching myself from a typical textbook. So if you have spent time in examining multiple textbooks yourself, which one would you recommend?

I really like Probability by Jim Pitman.
 

Klaas van Aarsen

MHB Seeker
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Mar 5, 2012
8,904
I have tutored a number of psychology students in statistics from different universities.
Obviously math was not their strong suit, which is why they came to me.
They came with various books.
There was (only) 1 book that I recommend: Introduction to the Practice of Statistics by Moore, McCabe, and Craig.
Its prerequisite is high school math.

It may well help you to brush up your statistics.
It would be over the top for regular high school statistics, but may fit AP.
I learned quite a bit from it myself while tutoring.

It contains roughly:
  • the axioms of probability,
  • the descriptives of statistics,
  • hypothesis testing,
  • z-tests, t-tests, F-tests, chi-2 tests
  • linear/multiple regression
  • ANOVA
 
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Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
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Jan 26, 2012
4,197

Plato

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MHB Math Helper
Jan 27, 2012
196
I was thinking non-calculus-based. I'm not at a magnet school where freshmen are taking calculus. Do you have a suggestion for non-calc-based statistics?
Sorry, but I misunderstood what you meant. I thought that you wanted to self-study.
I agree that text is not suited for high school or even AP course.
 
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Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
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Jan 26, 2012
4,197
Sorry, but I misunderstood what you meant. I thought that you wanted to self-study.
I agree that text is not suited for high school or even AP course.
Sorry about the unclear wording on my part. What I meant was that I would need to self-study whatever book I use to teach the class, since it's been so long.
 

McDerm

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Jan 12, 2014
2
Did you find a good textbook? I'm in a similar situation. Looking for a good textbook to teach high school prob. & stats. courses from low end to high end students.
 
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Ackbach

Indicium Physicus
Staff member
Jan 26, 2012
4,197
Did you find a good textbook? I'm in a similar situation. Looking for a good textbook to teach high school prob. & stats. courses from low end to high end students.
It's not looking terrific for me to teach stats next year (insufficient number of teachers and students, combined with a competition for a College Algebra course). However, it might happen the year after. If so, I'm thinking I would just go with Introduction to the Practice of Statistics, by Moore and McCabe (and Craig?).
 

McDerm

New member
Jan 12, 2014
2
It's not looking terrific for me to teach stats next year (insufficient number of teachers and students, combined with a competition for a College Algebra course). However, it might happen the year after. If so, I'm thinking I would just go with Introduction to the Practice of Statistics, by Moore and McCabe (and Craig?).
Thanks, I'll check it out.