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Finding the vertex, y-intercept and axis of symmetry

MammaOrnelas

New member
May 2, 2012
6
I am lost and confused. I have been on the same problem for 2 hours. I know all the formulas, but I'm not doing something right.....
 

Unknown008

Member
Feb 1, 2012
20
For a general equation [tex]y = a(x-b)^2 + c[/tex], the vertex is (b, c), the axis of symmetry x = b and the y-intercept is obtained by setting x = 0.

That form of a quadratic equation is called the completed square form.
 

MammaOrnelas

New member
May 2, 2012
6
Is it okay if you call me? I have soooooooooooooooo much homework left to do and my final is tomorrow. I have been stuck for the last 5 hours.....
 

Unknown008

Member
Feb 1, 2012
20
I'd love to... but I'm from the other side of the world and I doubt I can afford the telephone bills (Worried)

I'd be very happy to help you as much as I can here, should you have any problems.
 

MammaOrnelas

New member
May 2, 2012
6
I think it will be easier on both parts if you can talk me through it.

---------- Post added at 23:09 ---------- Previous post was at 23:07 ----------

the problem is f(x)= -3(x-6)^2-4 I know I have to set it equal to zero. It wants the vertex, y intercept and axis of symmetry. I don't know how to do this.

I had to miss three days of class last week due to a death of a family member in another state. I am extremely lost..............
 

Unknown008

Member
Feb 1, 2012
20
Okay, from what I gave you earlier, can you see that:

a = -3
b = 6
c = -4

?
 

MammaOrnelas

New member
May 2, 2012
6
sorta....i know that when its ex: x^2+4x+8, i know which ones are a, b, and c. But I don't see how you could tell which one was a b and c in that problem. Do I have to solve the problem first?
 

Unknown008

Member
Feb 1, 2012
20
Not at all! And you'll see that it's just like your example x^2 + 4x + 8.

That one general form is: [tex]y = ax^2 + bx +c[/tex]
Your example: [tex]y = x^2 + 4x + 8[/tex]

Which makes: a = 1, b = 4 and c = 8.

In the completed square form, we have:
[tex]y = a(x-b)^2 + c[/tex]
And in your problem: [tex]y= -3(x-6)^2-4[/tex]

In the same way, we have: a = -3, b = 6 and c = 4.

Does that make things clearer?

And subsequently, remember what I said in my first post here:
Vertex = (b, c)
Axis of symmetry = x = b
y-intercept is obtained by putting x = 0.
 

MammaOrnelas

New member
May 2, 2012
6
makes a little bit more sense....i was thinking since the (....) part was squared, I had to solve it first.... I rememberd that b is what ever makes the (.....) = 0 and that was it. Okay...lemme go try and work this problem. It's on mymathlab.com and I hate it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thanks for the tips....brb

---------- Post added at 23:30 ---------- Previous post was at 23:26 ----------

I got all of it right but it said that the y-intercept is (0,-112).....how did they get that
 

Unknown008

Member
Feb 1, 2012
20
Okay, let's see:

[tex]y = -3(x-6)^2-4[/tex]

By putting x = 0, we get:

[tex]y = -3(0-6)^2-4[/tex]

[tex]y = -3(36)-4[/tex]

[tex]y = -108-4[/tex]

[tex]y = -117[/tex]

Wasn't that easy? (Wink)
 

MammaOrnelas

New member
May 2, 2012
6
I see now....i was making the whole parethense 0 and getting -7 for my answer....Okay...it gave me a new problem.....let me try it!!!!!!