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finding the limit of a function

coolbeans33

New member
Sep 19, 2013
23
A(z)= 2z-6/ z2-5z+6

find the limit as z-->3

I factored the denominator to get (z-2)(z-3), and manipulated the function to get:

2z2-62/(z-2)(z-3)(2z+6)

but I'm just not sure what to do in order to get rid of the (z-3)

I hope there's some obvious answer that I'm not seeing!
 

SuperSonic4

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Mar 1, 2012
249
A(z)= 2z-6/ z2-5z+6

find the limit as z-->3

I factored the denominator to get (z-2)(z-3), and manipulated the function to get:

2z2-62/(z-2)(z-3)(2z+6)

but I'm just not sure what to do in order to get rid of the (z-3)

I hope there's some obvious answer that I'm not seeing!
You can factor the numerator to \(\displaystyle 2(z-3)\). Since z never reaches 3 you can cancel \(\displaystyle x-3\)