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Find the amount of moles of carbon dioxide produced during the reaction

mathlearn

Active member
Jul 24, 2016
341
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i.If all the calcium carbonate used in set up X was used up for the reaction, what is the amount of moles of carbon dioxide produced during the reaction ? (Ca = 40, C = 12, O = 16)

My progress:

Molar mass of CaCO3=(40+12+(16*3))gmol-1=100 gmol-1

Molar mass of CO2=12 + 16* 2 gmol-1=44 gmol-1

After that what must be done ? :confused:

Many Thanks :)
 

SuperSonic4

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Mar 1, 2012
249
i.If all the calcium carbonate used in set up X was used up for the reaction, what is the amount of moles of carbon dioxide produced during the reaction ? (Ca = 40, C = 12, O = 16)

My progress:

Molar mass of CaCO3=(40+12+(16*3))gmol-1=100 gmol-1

Molar mass of CO2=12 + 16* 2 gmol-1=44 gmol-1

After that what must be done ? :confused:

Many Thanks :)
Now you've worked out the molar mass of your substances you can work out the amount of moles of CaCO3 using the equation \(\displaystyle n = \dfrac{m}{M_r} \text{ or } \text{moles} = \dfrac{\text{mass}}{\text{molar mass}}\)

\(\displaystyle n_{CaCO_3} = \dfrac{5}{100} = \dfrac{1}{20} = 0.05 \text{mol}\)


Next consider the balanced reaction that is taking place here which is that of a carbonate with acid

\(\displaystyle CaCO_{3 (s)} + 2HCl_{(aq)} \rightarrow CaCl_{2 (s)} + CO_{2 (g)} + H_2O_{(l)}\)

From the equation above we see that one mole of \(\displaystyle CaCO_3\) produces one mole of \(\displaystyle CO_2\) which means you'll have \(\displaystyle 0.05\) moles of \(\displaystyle CO_2\) which is the answer to your question.
 

mathlearn

Active member
Jul 24, 2016
341