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Expectations in Graduate Level

Sudharaka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Feb 5, 2012
1,621
Hi everyone, :)

Stuck in a terribly difficult assignment I came to think of the following. What is the expectancy level from a grad student? I mean in undergraduate assignments we were given more often computational type questions, if we are given proofs they aren't so difficult. Then in grad level I found that it's the other way around. Almost always we have to prove things. Some are in fact equivalent to theorems in the recommended text books. Is it that the perfect grad student need to be able to prove every theorem in the book? What is your idea about this? :)
 

dwsmith

Well-known member
Feb 1, 2012
1,673
Hi everyone, :)

Stuck in a terribly difficult assignment I came to think of the following. What is the expectancy level from a grad student? I mean in undergraduate assignments we were given more often computational type questions, if we are given proofs they aren't so difficult. Then in grad level I found that it's the other way around. Almost always we have to prove things. Some are in fact equivalent to theorems in the recommended text books. Is it that the perfect grad student need to be able to prove every theorem in the book? What is your idea about this? :)
I original was doing pure math in grad school until I realized I prefer applied. If have you qualifying or similar tests in your country, then yes you will be expected to prove major theorems in order to progress to candicacy or get your MS. At my school, for example, some of the old qualifiers would have prove the orbit stabilizer theorem on it as a question as well as Cauchy Goursat and some other big theorems. Those type proofs can be about 3 pages long.

My idea is to me it sounds about right.
 

ZaidAlyafey

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 17, 2013
1,667
Two years ago , I used to hate proofs. In the calculus book we were asked to prove simple results but I didn't like solving these types of questions. I think the reason is that I didn't get used to doing these stuff and I lacked the ability to analyze and construct formal proofs. After taking some courses on proofs , they are now may favorite questions. When you see the wording of a theorem in real or complex analysis you realize it is written with care.It has to follow the laws of logic .I believe that proofs are just like computational problems you have to get used to them and prove as many theorems as you can.
 

Petrus

Well-known member
Feb 21, 2013
739