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Engineering Mechanics: airplane landing

Joe_1234

New member
May 15, 2020
25
The landing speed of an airplane is 360 kph. When it touches down, it puts on its brakes and reverses its engines. The retardation in its speed is 0.2 times the square root of its speed. Determine the time elapsed in seconds from the point of touchdown until the plane comes to a complete stop.
 

skeeter

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Mar 1, 2012
644
$\dfrac{dv}{dt} = -k\sqrt{v}$ , where $k=0.2$

solve the separable differential equation for velocity as a function of time.

you are given $v_0 = 360 \, km/hr$ (you’ll need to convert to m/s). use it to determine the constant of integration.
 

Joe_1234

New member
May 15, 2020
25
$\dfrac{dv}{dt} = -k\sqrt{v}$ , where $k=0.2$

solve the separable differential equation for velocity as a function of time.

you are given $v_0 = 360 \, km/hr$ (you’ll need to convert to m/s). use it to determine the constant of integration.
Sir thank you.
 

Joe_1234

New member
May 15, 2020
25
Thank you Sir. Please help me solve again for the length of runway it will from the point of touchdown until it comes to a complete stop.
 

skeeter

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Mar 1, 2012
644
Thank you Sir. Please help me solve again for the length of runway it will from the point of touchdown until it comes to a complete stop.
once you've determined $v(t)$ and solved for the time required to stop ...

$\displaystyle \Delta x = \int_0^T v(t) \, dt$ , where $T$ is the time required to come to a full stop.
 

Joe_1234

New member
May 15, 2020
25
once you've determined $v(t)$ and solved for the time required to stop ...

$\displaystyle \Delta x = \int_0^T v(t) \, dt$ , where $T$ is the time required to come to a full stop.
Thanks a lot sir😊
 

Joe_1234

New member
May 15, 2020
25
once you've determined $v(t)$ and solved for the time required to stop ...

$\displaystyle \Delta x = \int_0^T v(t) \, dt$ , where $T$ is the time required to come to a full stop.
Sir, please help me how to get v(t)
 

skeeter

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Mar 1, 2012
644
$\dfrac{dv}{dt} = -0.2 \sqrt{v}$

$\dfrac{dv}{\sqrt{v}} = -0.2 \, dt$

$2\sqrt{v} = -0.2t + C$

can you finish from here?
 

MarkFL

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 24, 2012
13,736
Sir, please help me how to get v(t)
As skeeter posted, finding the velocity involves solving the following IVP:

\(\displaystyle \d{v}{t} = -k\sqrt{v}\) where \(v(0)=v_0\)

The ODE associated with this IVP is separable, and I would next write:

\(\displaystyle \int_{v_0}^{v(t)} \frac{1}{\sqrt{a}}\,da=-k\int_0^t\,db\)

Try seeing if you can proceed from there and get the same result you get from skeeter's post made above just now...