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ellipse

veronica1999

Member
Jun 4, 2012
63
How do I graph this ellipse?

It doesn't seem to be in the right form.

(x+2)^2 /5 + 2 (y-1)^2 = 1

I don't know what to do with the 2 in front of the (y-1)^2

Doesn't an ellipse have to be x^2/a^2 + y^2/b^2 = 1
 

Sudharaka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Feb 5, 2012
1,621
How do I graph this ellipse?

It doesn't seem to be in the right form.

(x+2)^2 /5 + 2 (y-1)^2 = 1

I don't know what to do with the 2 in front of the (y-1)^2

Doesn't an ellipse have to be x^2/a^2 + y^2/b^2 = 1
Hi veronica1999, :)

Yes, an ellipse has its equation as, \(\displaystyle\frac{x^2}{a^2} + \frac{y^2}{b^2} = 1\) if its major and minor axes coincides with the \(x\) and \(y\) axes of the Cartesian coordinate system. In this case the center point of the ellipse is at the origin. However a ellipse with its center point at, \((x_{0},y_{0})\) has an equation of the form,

\[\frac{(x-x_{0})^2}{a^2} + \frac{(y-y_{0})^2}{b^2} = 1\]

In your case the ellipse is centered at, \((-2,1)\). Now you should be able to draw your ellipse. :)

Kind Regards,
Sudharaka.
 

veronica1999

Member
Jun 4, 2012
63
Thanks.
But I am still not sure what to do with the 2 in front of the (y-1)^2.
Could it have been a mistype meaning (y-1)^2/2 instead of 2(y-1)^2?
 

Sudharaka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Feb 5, 2012
1,621
Thanks.
But I am still not sure what to do with the 2 in front of the (y-1)^2.
Could it have been a mistype meaning (y-1)^2/2 instead of 2(y-1)^2?
Of course not. You can rearrange the equation by taking that \(2\) to the denominator like this,

\[\frac{(x+2)^2}{5} + \frac{(y-1)^2}{\frac{1}{2}} = 1\]

Is it clear to you now? :)
 

veronica1999

Member
Jun 4, 2012
63
Yes!!!!;)

Thank you!!!
 

Sudharaka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Feb 5, 2012
1,621