Welcome to our community

Be a part of something great, join today!

Calculating real world Liquid gas values

panpan

New member
Apr 12, 2018
6
Hello,

I am trying to calculate the price of Liquid Gas of 1 TCF - My researce revealed to me that:

1 - I know that 100 cubic feet (Ccf) of natural gas equals 103,700 Btu or 1.037 therms
2 - I know that price per MMBtu multiplied by 1.037 equals price per Mcf
3 - The price of one MMBtu is about 2.77 USD
4 - One BTU is equivalent to1.06 Joules

I'm very confused about how many "Naughts" are in MMBTu's or other shot forms as I have read in different websites holding different values? Like The net states that 1MCF is = 1000CF but is M a million? Or a M as in Mega or roman numerals.

How much in USD is 1 TCF and how do i calculate it?
How much MegaJoules are in that much TCF as well how much would it cost in a form of MegaJoules.
 
Last edited:

Janssens

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2017
203
Hello,

I am trying to calculate the price of Liquid Gas of 1 TCF - My researce revealed to me that:

1 - I know that 100 cubic feet (Ccf) of natural gas equals 103,700 Btu or 1.037 therms
2 - I know that price per MMBtu multiplied by 1.037 equals price per Mcf
3 - The price of one MMBtu is about 2.77 USD
4 - One BTU is equivalent to1.06 Joules

I'm very confused about how many "Naughts" are in MMBTu's or other shot forms as I have read in different websites holding different values? Like The net states that 1MCF is = 1000CF but is M a million? Or a M as in Mega or roman numerals.

How much in USD is 1 TCF and how do i calculate it?
How much MegaJoules are in that much TCF as well how much would it cost in a form of MegaJoules.
I had to look up what TCF is, but I think the prefixes refer to Latin numerals:

C = "cent" = hundred
M = "mille" = thousand
MM = "mille mille" = million

and TCF is 1 trillion cubic feet of gas. I don't know what "naughts" means in this context, but maybe the above can remove some of the confusion?

For example, based on what you provided,

price of 1 TCF = 1000 * 1000 * 1000 * price of 1 MCF = 1000 * 1000 * 1000 * (1.037 * price of 1 MMBtu)

and now you can use item 3. in your post.

Note, however, that for real large volume "business" calculations you may have to be more careful, as the may not always increase directly proportionately to the quantity: When you purchase a lot, you may start to get a discount.
 

panpan

New member
Apr 12, 2018
6
I see..

When I say "Naughts" I was meaning to say "zeros".

Does that make sense now?

Could you explain it algebraically or in a deeper context. Ignoring discounts and such.
 

Janssens

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2017
203
I see..

When I say "Naughts" I was meaning to say "zeros".

Does that make sense now?
Ah ok, yes, I see.

Could you explain it algebraically or in a deeper context. Ignoring discounts and such.
The algebraic explanation is largely in the example formula I gave: To go from one volume unit to the next larger volume unit, you multiply by 1000 or multiples of 1000. It appears that customary large-volume units are the MCF, MMCF, BCF and TCF. The formula arises because

1 trillion = 1000 * 1 billion
1 billion = 1000 * 1 million
1 million = 1000 * 1 thousand
 

panpan

New member
Apr 12, 2018
6
Hrmm this is getting difficult XD

Wouldn't 1TCF just be 1,000,000,000,000 Cubic Feet?
 
Last edited:

Klaas van Aarsen

MHB Seeker
Staff member
Mar 5, 2012
8,780
Hrmm this is getting difficult XD

Wouldn't 1TCF just be 1,000,000,000,000 Cubic Feet?
My mistake. I've deleted my post.
You're quite right. A trillion (on the so called short scale) is indeed 1,000,000,000,000.
 

Country Boy

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 30, 2018
464
Another complication: in the United States, a "trillion" is a "million million" so 1,000,000,000,000 (12 zeros). Since you say "naughts" for "zeros" you may be in England where a "trillion is a "million million million", 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 (18 zeros).
 

Monoxdifly

Well-known member
Aug 6, 2015
284
Another complication: in the United States, a "trillion" is a "million million" so 1,000,000,000,000 (12 zeros).
Wow, I thought only Indonesians do that.
 

topsquark

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Aug 30, 2012
1,123
Another complication: in the United States, a "trillion" is a "million million" so 1,000,000,000,000 (12 zeros). Since you say "naughts" for "zeros" you may be in England where a "trillion is a "million million million", 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 (18 zeros).
I never knew that. Thanks, I'll have to keep that one in my back pocket.

First driving on the wrong side of the road and now this...

-Dan
 

Klaas van Aarsen

MHB Seeker
Staff member
Mar 5, 2012
8,780
I never knew that. Thanks, I'll have to keep that one in my back pocket.

First driving on the wrong side of the road and now this...

-Dan
Erm.. you are from the US aren't you?
Isn't that where they have non-SI short trillions and such?
And where this whole mess is of 'real world liquid values' with cubic feet and milles-instead-of-millions?
Btw, this is not part of my 'real world', where we don't have such weird conversion factors. We just have SI.
(For the record, I'm still confused that kilogram is an SI-unit even though it includes a multiplication prefix.)