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A recent trend I have observed...

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MarkFL

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Feb 24, 2012
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This is math related, but I felt this topic best belongs here in the chat room as opposed to the calculus forum.

When I was a student, we were introduced in Calc I, to two forms of the fundamental theorem, the derivative form and the anti-derivative form.

I have observed on several forums that it seems recently that students are referring to these as the first and second theorems of calculus. Now my question is: is this a recent trend or is this something that has been around for a long time and I am only now noticing it?
 
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Jameson

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Jan 26, 2012
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I first took calculus in 2005 and I'm pretty sure it was presented as 1st and 2nd. Even Wolfram presents it like that, but I just found that out :)

Do you think presenting it as one theorem in two parts versus two theorems has any impact or implications?
 
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MarkFL

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Feb 24, 2012
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Well, we were actually presented with it as one theorem in two forms as well. I soon came to see it as a very useful and beautiful bridge between the two elementary branches of calculus.

I haven't felt there are any implications, they are being applied in the same way. I guess it is just a change from the names I learned. I was curious what the motivation behind the name change is, as I find the names I learned to be more descriptive, but maybe I am just being an old codger shaking his bony fist at a changing world! :eek:(Emo)
 
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MarkFL

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Feb 24, 2012
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I should add I was a student in the early to mid 90s, about 20 years ago.
 

Fantini

"Read Euler, read Euler." - Laplace
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Feb 29, 2012
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I'm not sure this is a new trend. I have learned just as you have: the two forms of the fundamental theorem of calculus. This presentation lends itself to the later generality as Stokes' theorem, of which the fundamental theorem of calculus is a particular case. (Clapping)
 

find_the_fun

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Feb 1, 2012
166
When I took calculus in 2009 it was presented this way, though the prof said it was too bad it was "because it's really two sides of the same coin".