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Number Theory a³ + b³ ≠ c³

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Prove that
\(\displaystyle a^3+b^3 \ne to \ c^3 \ if \ a,b \ and \ c \in \ {N}\)

This is not a challenge,I am asking for help...

Any help is appreciated....

Thanks....
 
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MarkFL

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 24, 2012
13,775
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

By Fermat's Last Theorem, which was proved by Andrew Wiles, we know there are no solutions to the Diophantine equation:

\(\displaystyle x^n+y^n=z^n\)

for $2<n$.
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

By Fermat's Last Theorem, which was proved by Andrew Wiles, we know there are no solutions to the Diophantine equation:
Yeah,thats what I am doing...trying to prove FLT...
And this is a first step,please tell me how can I prove this
 

Bacterius

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 26, 2012
644
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

There are standalone proofs for a few of the simpler exponents (3, 4, 5, ..) but the complete proof for all exponents is hardcore - you probably don't want to try and "prove FLT". Many mathematicians have tried and failed. Only one has succeeded and the mathematical background required is insane.

Take a look here to get some insight: Proof of Fermat's Last Theorem for specific exponents - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

But I believe proving it for n=3 is simple....

Am I wrong...?
 

Bacterius

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 26, 2012
644
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

But I believe proving it for n=3 is simple....

Am I wrong...?
Not at all, proving it for n = 3 is not too difficult. But you are not "proving FLT" in this case, you are only proving one of infinitely many cases of the theorem.
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

I know I cannot prove FLT for infinite,so I decided to try it for a few n.But I found it impossible(for me)to do...

Now can you give the proof,Bacterius?
 
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Bacterius

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 26, 2012
644
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

I knew I cannot prove FLT for infinite,so I decided to try it for a few n.But I found it impossible(for me)to do...

Now can you give the proof,Bacterius?
I just linked it..
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

Ok...

Proving it for any n requires knowledge on group theory and galois theory,right?

I will come back at it someday...
 

MarkFL

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 24, 2012
13,775
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

If I recall correctly, Wiles essentially cut himself off from the world and worked on it in virtual solitude for seven years.
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Like John Nash in "A Beautiful Mind"...??
 

ZaidAlyafey

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 17, 2013
1,667
Two days ago I watched a video about FLT here .It gave me some hope to try the Riemann Hypothesis :rolleyes: . The interesting thing is that Wiles used an advanced method to prove it (using elliptic curves and modular forms) but Fermat claimed to have a proof for it , was it (if it exists) as complicated as Wiles's? , I don't think so !
 

MarkFL

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 24, 2012
13,775
I believe the consensus is that Fermat did not have a general proof as he claimed, but rather had a proof of a specific case or cases at best. I don't see how an elementary proof could have eluded the world's greatest mathematical minds for nearly 360 years.
 

ZaidAlyafey

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 17, 2013
1,667
I believe the consensus is that Fermat did not have a general proof as he claimed, but rather had a proof of a specific case or cases at best. I don't see how an elementary proof could have eluded the world's greatest mathematical minds for nearly 360 years.
Most of the time , it is not how elementary a proof is but rather how brilliantly we construct it .
 

mathbalarka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Mar 22, 2013
573
mathmaniac said:
Proving it for any n requires knowledge on group theory and galois theory,right
Yes. It is basically based on the statement that every semistable elliptic curve is modular. It took my quite long to understand the whole proof of modularity theorem.

FLT for n = 3 is easy. I know two proofs of it, one by Fermat's Infinite Descent and another by usual arithmatic over \(\displaystyle \mathbb{Q} \left (\sqrt{3} \right ) \)
 
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caffeinemachine

Well-known member
MHB Math Scholar
Mar 10, 2012
834
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

I know I cannot prove FLT for infinite,so I decided to try it for a few n.But I found it impossible(for me)to do...

Now can you give the proof,Bacterius?
Hello mathmaniac,

Its a good thing that you are attempting to prove such things. But I'd like to mention something here. If you need help on such questions (and even on easier ones) I think you must show some effort. At least spend some time googling and many times that will solve your query. Post some of your ideas, good or bad, along with the question. Bacterius had linked the proof you were looking for but I guess you overlooked. Please understand that it takes a lot of effort and time to write a math proof in LaTeX.

I don't mean to upset anyone who helped out in this thread. My apologies in advance.

-Caffeinemachine.
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Re: a^3+b^3 not equal to c^3

But I'd like to mention something here. If you need help on such questions (and even on easier ones) I think you must show some effort.
I thought a lot on it.And you mean show it here?Ok,I first thought about n=2 and why it works.
And I understood why it works.I don't think its any use to type it here...

Ok,let me ask another question.Forget the earlier one.

Any square number can be written as a sum of odd numbers.Can the cubes be written any any ways like it?

At least spend some time googling and many times that will solve your query.
Honestly,I didn't do it.I always see google as a last resort.(but I also use it for hints)
I was actually looking for a hint to try again to prove it on my own...
I thought typing \(\displaystyle a^3+b^3 \ne c^3\) in google won't give the results I wanted.But I never tried...

Post some of your ideas, good or bad, along with the question. Bacterius had linked the proof you were looking for but I guess you overlooked. Please understand that it takes a lot of effort and time to write a math proof in LaTeX.
Its okay,I can clearly understand the hardship of latexing,I've known it...


I don't mean to upset anyone who helped out in this thread.
I also think I should've used google rather than approaching here for a hint.
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
FLT for n=2(as I know it)

\(\displaystyle a^2+b^2\) can be equal to \(\displaystyle c^2\) in some cases as we know about Phythagorean triplets...

Any square number can be written as a sum of consecutive odd numbers.
4=1+3,9=1+3+5...etc

So \(\displaystyle a^2=1+3+5+7+9....\)
So \(\displaystyle a^2+b^2=(1+3+5+....) \ \ \ + \ (1+3+....)\)
Also \(\displaystyle c^2=1+3+5+....\)

This can happen if \(\displaystyle b^2\) adds to the consecutive string of odd numbers of \(\displaystyle a^2\) or vice versa...

So there can be \(\displaystyle a,b \ and \ c \ all \in N \) such that \(\displaystyle a^2+b^2=c^2\)
 

mathbalarka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Mar 22, 2013
573
FLT says there are no tuples (a,b,c) in R3 such that a^n + b^n = c^n for n > 2. There are infinitely many solutions for n = 2.
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Yeah and I 've just shown why it is possible...

Can this be used to prove for n=3 and for any n(too ambitious)...?
 

mathbalarka

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Mar 22, 2013
573
Absolutely not.
 

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
OK...
 

ZaidAlyafey

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MHB Math Helper
Jan 17, 2013
1,667

mathmaniac

Active member
Mar 4, 2013
188
Check my proof(not a perfect proof actually,better to be called reasoning)
If you can't see it tell me because I think I got it...
 

ZaidAlyafey

Well-known member
MHB Math Helper
Jan 17, 2013
1,667
Check my proof(not a perfect proof actually,better to be called reasoning)
If you can't see it tell me because I think I got it...
I can't see how general is that :confused: