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  1. MHB Master

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    #1
    We used to have a bunch of problems and proofs that were in a pdf could be downloaded by anyone. Since we aren't able to upload pdf files of a certain size, I provided a link to google docs. If there is an error, typo, or something is just drastic wrong let me know.

    [URL="http://mathhelpboards.com/commentary-threads-53/commentary-linear-algebra-proofs-problems-4230.html[/URL]
    Last edited by MarkFL; April 7th, 2013 at 14:51. Reason: Added link to commentary topic

  2. MHB Master

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    For the first document, here is what Ackbeet$\equiv $Ackbach suggested on MHF that needed to be adjusted
    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet View Post
    Very nice review! I just had a few comments:


    1. From Test 5, Problem 4, on page 4. I would say more than eigenvectors must be nonzero, by definition. It's not that the zero eigenvector case is trivial: it's that it's not allowed.


    2. Page 6, Problem 8: typo in problem statement. Change "I of -I" to "I or -I".


    3. Page 8, Problem 21: the answer is correct, but the reasoning is incorrect. It is not true that $\mathbf{x}$ and $\mathbf{y}$ are linearly independent if and only if $|\mathbf{x}^{T}\mathbf{y}|=0.$ That is the condition for orthogonality, which is a stronger condition than linear independence. Counterexample: $\mathbf{x}=(\sqrt{2}/2)(1,1),$ and $\mathbf{y}=(1,0).$ Both are unit vectors, as stipulated. We have that $|\mathbf{x}^{T}\mathbf{y}|=\sqrt{2}/2\not=0,$ and yet
    $a\mathbf{x}+b\mathbf{y}=\mathbf{0}$ requires$a=b=0,$ which implies linear independence.


    Instead, the argument should just produce a simple counterexample, such as $\mathbf{x}=\mathbf{y}=(1,0)$.


    Good work, though!

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